The Ten Commandments
A book by Joseph Lewis
Introduction


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The Difference between the Ten Commandments Recorded in the Book of Exodus and the Book of Deuteronomy

Some readers might consider that the "variants" which differentiate the wording of the Commandments in the Exodus and Deuteronomy versions are too inconsequential to be taken up in a separate section. This would be a valid criticism if these variations occurred only in the different versions of the Bible. But since they appear in the same volume, they are serious differences and highly significant as to the utter unreliability of the Biblical narrative concerning the Ten Commandments. [**8]

Exodus

First Commandment, Chapter 20, Verse 2

2. I am the Lord thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.

Deuteronomy

First Commandment, Chapter 5, Verse 6

6. I am the Lord thy God, which brought thee out of the land of Egypt, from the house of bondage.

Already there is a noticeable difference between these two sets of Commandments. In the Exodus version, the word "have" is used, but it is not present in the Deuteronomy version. The last phrase in Exodus reads, "out of the house of bondage," and the Deuteronomy version uses "from the house of bondage." This first Commandment does "exhibit some variants," though slight. Page 17

Exodus

Second Commandment, Chapter 20, Verses 3 to 6

3. Thou shalt have no other gods before me.

4. Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth;

5. Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the Lord thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;

6. And showing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep my commandments.

Deuteronomy

Second Commandment, Chapter 5, Verses 7 to 10

7. Thou shalt have none other gods before me.

8. Thou shalt not make thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the waters beneath the earth:

9. Thou shalt not bow down thyself unto them, nor serve them: for I the Lord thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me,

10. And showing mercy unto thousands of them that love me and keep my commandments.

Again the facsimile "exhibits some variants." The Exodus version reads, "thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them," while the Deuteronomy version states, "thou shalt not bow down thyself unto them, nor serve them"; also in the Exodus version we find these words: "or that is in the water under the earth," in contrast to the Deuteronomy version, which says, "or that is in the waters beneath the earth."

Exodus

Third Commandment, Chapter 20, Verse 7

7. Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain: for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.

 

Deuteronomy

Third Commandment, Chapter 5, Verse 11

11. Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain: for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.

There is no difference between these two versions of the Third Commandment, with the exception of the italicized word him in the Deuteronomy version. Page 18

Exodus

Fourth Commandment, Chapter 20, Verses 8 to 11

8. Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy.

9. Six days shalt thou labor, and do all thy work:

10. But the seventh day is the sabbath of the Lord thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates:

11. For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.

 

Deuteronomy

Fourth Commandment, Chapter 5, Verses 12 to 15

12. Keep the sabbath day to sanctify it, as the Lord thy God hath commanded thee.

13. Six days thou shalt labor, and do all thy work:

14. But the seventh day is the sabbath of the Lord thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, nor thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thine ox, nor thine ass, nor any of thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates; that thy manservant and thy maidservant may rest as well as thou.

15. And remember that thou wast a servant in the land of Egypt, and that the Lord thy God brought thee out thence through a mighty hand and by a stretched out arm: therefore the Lord thy God commanded thee to keep the sabbath day.

In the Fourth Commandment as recorded in Exodus, ninety-four words were used to express this Commandment, but in Deuteronomy one hundred and thirty-three words were necessary to express it. However, the difference between the number of words is not so important as the difference in what they say. The reason given for observing the Sabbath as recorded in Exodus is "For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day"; the reason given in Deuteronomy is "that thou wast a servant in the land of Egypt, and that the Lord thy God brought thee out thence through a mighty hand and by a stretched out arm: therefore the Lord thy God commanded thee to keep the sabbath day."

Whether God commanded the Sabbath to be observed for the reason that he "rested" after laboring for six days, or because "thou wast a servant in the land of Egypt," is a matter far more serious than a mere "variant."

Verses 2 and 3 of the 2nd Chapter of Genesis, although supportingPage 19 the reason for the Sabbath as recorded in Exodus, are in direct contradiction to the reason stated in Deuteronomy. For additional evidence of conflict with the Deuteronomy version, consider these important quotations from Exodus, Chapter 31, verses 12 to 17:

12. And the Lord spake unto Moses saying,

13. Speak thou also unto the children of Israel, saying, Verily my sabbaths ye shall keep: for it is a sign between me and you throughout your generations; that ye may know that I am the Lord that doth sanctify you.

14. Ye shall keep the sabbath therefore; for it is holy unto you. Every one that defileth it shall surely be put to death: for whosoever doeth any work therein, that soul shall be cut off from among his people.

15. Six days may work be done; but in the seventh is the sabbath of rest, holy to the Lord: whosoever doeth any work in the sabbath day, he shall surely be put to death.

16. Wherefore the children of Israel shall keep the sabbath, to observe the sabbath throughout their generations, for a perpetual covenant.

17. It is a sign between me and the children of Israel for ever: for in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, and on the seventh day he rested, and was refreshed.

It is obvious from this quotation that the Sabbath was to be observed because the Lord rested on the seventh day, which contradicts the reason given for the Commandment as recorded in the very same source, the Book of Exodus. This raises the serious question as to whether or not the Sabbath is only as old as Moses or as old as creation -- and what a "variant" that is! [**9]

One or the other must be condemned as false, and since it is impossible to determine which one, and since both stand in the same relation to each other, both should be rejected until substantiating evidence is found in support of one or the other version. Neither possesses internal evidence of being an "inspired" revelation. Page 20

Exodus

Fifth Commandment, Chapter 20, Verse 12

12. Honor thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee.

Deuteronomy

Fifth Commandment, Chapter 5, Verse 16

16. Honor thy father and thy mother, as the Lord thy God hath commanded thee; that thy days may be prolonged, and that it may go well with thee, in the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee.

There are twenty-two words in the version of Exodus compared with thirty-eight words in Deuteronomy, and the latter contains an additional reason for honoring parents. Which is the correct and authentic declaration? Shall you honor your parents that "thy days may be prolonged, and that it may go well with thee," or that "thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee"?

Exodus

Sixth Commandment, Chapter 20, Verse 13

Thou shalt not kill.

Deuteronomy

Sixth Commandment, Chapter 5, Verse 17

Thou shalt not kill.

The Sixth Commandment of only four words shows no variant.

Exodus

Seventh Commandment' Chapter 20, Verse 14

Thou shalt not commit adultery.

Deuteronomy

Seventh Commandment, Chapter 5, Verse 18

Neither shalt thou commit adultery.

That there is a difference in wording in this Commandment is important, though there is no difference in meaning.

Exodus

Eighth Commandment, Chapter 20, Verse 15

Thou shalt not steal.

Deuteronomy

Eighth Commandment, Chapter 5, Verse 19

Neither shalt thou steal.

The same difference prevails concerning this Commandment as the previous one. Page 21

Exodus

Ninth Commandment, Chapter 20, Verse 16

Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor.

Deuteronomy

Ninth Commandment, Chapter 5, Verse 20

Neither shalt thou bear false witness against thy neighbor.

This difference is just as important a variation as in the previous Commandments.

Exodus

Tenth Commandment, Chapter 20, Verse 17

17. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbor's.

Deuteronomy

Tenth Commandment, Chapter 5, Verse 21

21. Neither shalt thou desire thy neighbor's wife, neither shalt thou covet thy neighbor's house, his field, or his manservant, or his maidservant, his ox, or his ass, or any thing that is thy neighbor's.

The above Commandment has the same differences as the three previously quoted with one additional "variant" and a very important and significant transposition. In Exodus the first line of the Commandment reads, "Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house," while in Deuteronomy the first line reads, "Neither shalt thou desire thy neighbor's wife." According to the best Biblical scholars, this indicates that the Deuteronomy version was written in a later period of culture than the Exodus version, because property in early Biblical days was considered of greater value than a wife. In this text the word "field" is also specified, whereas it is omitted in Exodus. [*10]

In the face of these "variants" and the obvious conclusion that one or the other must be wrong, which set is to be accepted and which one rejected? For no matter how small the "variant," it brands one or the other as not being "divinely inspired." The early rabbis, however, maintained that there could be no contradictions between the texts because they were both spoken simultaneously and miraculously by God. [*11Page 22

It is contended by some Biblical authorities that the italicized word in the Bible indicates the insertion of a missing word from the text of the manuscript from which it was translated. If this is true, then the conclusion is inevitable that the Biblical text is not infallible or that there is no authority for the inserted italicized word.

 
The Conflicting Arrangement of the Ten Commandments as Revealed by a Comparison of the Protestant, Catholic and Hebrew Versions [**12]

I have stated previously, and subsequent facts will prove, that not all the religions which accept these Commandments as the revealed words of God condense them in the same manner or interpret them the same way. They are arranged to suit the exigencies of the particular creed and to fit the ritual of the particular form of worship.

We are told by religious leaders that the Bible is the inspired word of God, and that man must not presume to pit his finite intelligence against it. Yet that is exactly what the religionists have done with so important a part of the Bible as the Ten Commandments -- God's supposed words written with his own finger!

We are told that regardless of other differences that might exist among these three religions, they are in perfect accord on the Ten Commandments!

If there is any place where perfect accord should exist in Biblical matters among the sects, it should be in the Decalogue. If they do not agree about the only message that God is supposed to have delivered himself, how can we expect to find them in agreement on matters about which they admit there exists much doubt and speculation?

Although the Protestant, Catholic and Hebrew Bibles vary but slightly and then only textually, the listing to follow reveals a deliberate change made by those responsible for the arrangement of the Commandments. Page 23

The Decalogue According to the Protestant Version [**13]

First Commandment

Thou shalt have no other gods before me.

The Decalogue According to the Catholic Version [**14]

First Commandment

I am the Lord thy God. Thou shalt not have strange gods before me.

The Decalogue According to the Hebrew Version [**15]

First Commandment

I am the Lord thy God, who brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery.

In the First Commandment, the reader will note that the words "I am the Lord thy God, who brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage," is left out of the Protestant version completely, and partially from the Catholic. It forms the First Commandment according to the Hebrews.

In the Catholic and Protestant versions, the reference to being "brought out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage," was left out for very good and sufficient reasons! That part of the Commandment has absolutely nothing whatever to do with Protestants or Catholics. When the Commandments were written, they were not in existence. They were never in Egypt, and the Lord had no occasion to free them from the yoke of bondage; by this very omission the Ten Commandments are stamped as a purely provincial code, applicable, if at all, only to the Children of Israel. In this respect both the Catholics and the Protestants have judiciously, yet deceitfully, refrained from using it, despite the incontrovertible fact that it is part of the Decalogue, and just as vital as the other parts.

In some editions of the Hebrew Bible, the word "bondage" has been substituted for "slavery." The explanation given for this change by the best Biblical authorities is that the Jews do not want to characterize Egypt as a place of slavery while the Jews living in Egypt are Page 24 enjoying liberty there. Was the integrity of the text sacrificed for the sake of expediency? [**16]

In wording this Commandment, however, the Catholics were cleverer than the Protestants. They used the first five words of the Commandment but left out the succeeding damaging phrase, and have added, though in a corrupted form, the first part of the Second Commandment. The Protestants, unable to use the First Commandment as biblically recorded, have daringly taken the first sentence of the Second Commandment as the first one in the arrangement of the Decalogue!

In an address over radio station WEAF, [**17] the second of a series dealing with the Ten Commandments, the Rev. James M. Gillis, C.S.P., made this statement: "On the tablets of Moses, the First Commandment read: 'I am the Lord thy God, thou shalt not have strange Gods before me.'" [**18]

I challenge this statement of the Rev. James M. Gillis, C.S.P., and state categorically: No such words appeared on the tablets of Moses as biblically recorded, and in making that statement he either deliberately falsified the text or is ignorant of the facts. If the former, it invalidates his right to discuss this question; and if the latter, it reveals his incompetence.

If the Rev. James M. Gillis does not accept my indictment, perhaps he will abide by the following quotation taken from the Douay Version of the Bible, "published with the imprimatur and approbation of His Eminence John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York."

I quote Exodus, Chapter 20, verses 1 and 2:

1. And the Lord spoke all these words;

2. I am the Lord thy God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. Page 25

Why did the Rev. James M. Gillis fail to include the words, "who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage," particularly when he states that "the Ten Commandments are not the voice of man -- they are the revelations of the mind and will of the Almighty," and "whether He whisper or whether He thunder, the message is the same, the infallible, everlasting moral law, in brief, the Ten Commandments"? [*19]

In the course of his discussion of the Ten Commandments, the Rev. James M. Gillis states that "a lie is a lie, whether it come out of the mouth, or off the page," and that "if to the lie is added fraud, restitution must be made otherwise, in the Catholic system absolution for the sin cannot be obtained." [*20] According to his own standard, James M. Gillis himself is placed in the category of those doomed by the dogma of his own Church.

Protestant

Second Commandment

4. Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth:

5. Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the Lord thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;

6. And showing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep my commandments.

Catholic

Second Commandment [**21]

Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain.

Hebrew

Second Commandment

3. Thou shalt have no other gods before Me.

4. Thou shalt not make unto thee a graven image, nor any manner of likeness, of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth;

5. Thou shalt not bow down unto them, nor serve them; for I the Lord thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate Me;

6. And showing mercy unto the thousandth generation of them that love Me and keep My commandments. Page 26

In addition to the italicized words which differentiate the Protestant and Hebrew versions of the Second Commandment, we find that the Catholics leave out the entire Second Commandment. They omit it because it would interfere with the most lucrative part of their ritual -- the worship and adoration of saints. Catholics not only make "graven images" in direct prohibition and violation of the Second Commandment, but they also worship these images in defiance of an angry and vengeful God. That the Roman Catholic Church has practised this defiance with impunity for centuries indicates either the impotence of the Bible God or the falsity of the Commandments.

Catholic historical records show that the Church has continuously, since the fourth century, published a mutilated set of Commandments and maintained it as the true version by prohibiting anyone from reading the Bible! [**22]

Since the Seventh General Council, 787 A.D., the Second Commandment has either been omitted or falsely explained away. In fact, so cleverly did the Catholic Church perpetrate this fraud that up to and even after the Reformation it was not discovered, and formed the Decalogue as accepted by the Anglican Church as late as 1563. So strongly was this mutilated version of the Commandments intrenched that even Martin Luther did not discover the imposition until several decades after his schism with Rome, [*23] and accounts for the Lutherans accepting the Catholic version of the Decalogue.

I am constrained to refer to the text of the Decalogue in Exodus of the Douay Version of the Bible for additional evidence of the perfidy of the Catholic Church in omitting the Second Commandment. The heading at the beginning of the chapter is "The Ten Commandments." I quote Chapter 20, verses 4, 5 and 6: Page 27

4. Thou shalt not make to thyself a graven thing, nor the likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or in the earth beneath, nor of those things that are in the waters under the earth.

5. Thou shalt not adore them, nor serve them: I am the Lord thy God, mighty, jealous, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children, unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me:

6. And showing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep my commandments.

In order to omit the Second Commandment from the Decalogue, not only must verses 8, 9 and 10 be eliminated from Chapter 5 of the Book of Deuteronomy, but the above verses 4, 5 and 6 must also be deleted from this chapter as well as from other portions of the Bible.

While the Catholic Catechism omits this Commandment from its arrangement of the Decalogue, the Catholic Encyclopedia admits its validity as part of the Ten Commandments and even its application to the prohibitions of making and worshiping graven images! [*24]

The Catholic Church stands convicted not only by evidence taken from its own records, but by its own authorities. The listing of the Ten Commandments as they appear in the Douay Version of the Bible has additional value to us besides furnishing incontrovertible evidence in indicting the Catholic Church for deliberate deception in omitting the Second Commandment from the Decalogue.

That image worship is a degrading superstition and was condemned by the early Church Fathers in scathing terms, is one of the amazing contradictions of Catholicism. St. Augustine, undoubtedly the foremost of the group, said: "He who worships an image turns the truth of God unto a lie." Even the crucifix, which is worshiped and adored today, is as much an idolatrous instrument as the image of a man or woman. It was introduced as part of the worship of the Church only in the latter part of the sixth century, and finally authorized by the Council of Constantinople, 692 A.D. The crucifix was Page 28 unknown until the sixth century, and liberal Protestants still abhor its use as being beneath the dignity of an intelligent person. [*25]

The Christians of France, Germany and England condemned the action of the Seventh General Council authorizing the worship of images, and foremost among the opponents was Charlemagne.

It would require too lengthy an analysis to give the complete reason why the Roman Catholic Church violates this Commandment and omits it from its version of the Decalogue. Suffice it to say that when Constantine embraced Christianity, he found that the incurably superstitious would not relinquish their idols, and so the Church, after a feeble and unsuccessful effort, merely incorporated image worship as part of its ritual. The financial returns more than justified the compromise with "God's Word."

In order to make up for the omission of the Second Commandment, the Catholic Church moved up the third and made it the second. It will be interesting, as we continue this comparison, to see for ourselves how they schemingly provided for the "ten."

With the exception of using the first sentence of this Commandment as the first of the Decalogue, the Protestants and the Hebrews differ only slightly in the wording, which is not particularly important in this comparison.

Protestant

Third Commandment

7. Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain: for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.

Catholic

Third Commandment

Remember thou keep the Sabbath Day.

Hebrew

Third Commandment

7. Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain; for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh His name in vain.

For the first time there is perfect accord between the Protestants and Hebrews on one of the Commandments. The Catholics, however, in order to make up for the omission of the Second Commandment, merely move up the next one, making the fourth the third. There seems to be no justification for the mutilated form in which they Page 29 express it, nor can I find a reason for its mutilation, except to avoid the embarrassing question of why it is to be observed.

Protestant

Fourth Commandment

Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy.

Six days shalt thou labor, and do all thy work:

But the seventh day is the sabbath of the Lord thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates:

For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.

Catholic

Fourth Commandment

Honor thy Father and thy Mother.

Hebrew

Fourth Commandment

Remember the sabbath day to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work. But the seventh day is the sabbath in honour of the Lord thy God; on it thou shalt not do any work, neither thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates; For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day; therefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.

While the difference between the Protestant and Hebrew versions is mostly italicized words, we find that again the Catholic Church has misplaced the Fifth Commandment and listed it as the fourth, with the same omissions.

Protestant

Fifth Commandment

Honor thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee.

Catholic

Fifth Commandment

Thou shalt not kill.

Hebrew

Fifth Commandment

Honour thy father and thy mother; in order that thy days may be prolonged upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee. [*26]

Again the Catholics have moved the sixth to the place of the fifth, whereas the Protestant and Hebrew differ only textually. Page 30

Protestant

Sixth Commandment

Thou shalt not kill.

Catholic

Sixth Commandment

Thou shalt not commit adultery.

Hebrew

Sixth Commandment

Thou shalt not kill.

In this Commandment, the Protestants and the Hebrews are also in accord, while the Catholics have placed the Seventh Commandment in the position of the sixth. It is a notorious fact that when the Catholics wish to admonish their adherents against the violation of this Commandment, they never refer to it by number. [**27]

Protestant

Seventh Commandment

Thou shalt not commit adultery.

Catholic

Seventh Commandment

Thou shalt not steal.

Hebrew

Seventh Commandment

Thou shalt not commit adultery.

Once more the Protestants and the Hebrews are in accord, while the Catholics continue to move up a Commandment in order to provide for the omission of the second.

In passing, I should like to mention that this Commandment was once placed before the one referring to killing because at one time adultery was considered the greater offense. In fact, in the oldest Biblical manuscript, a parchment known as the "Nash Manuscript," the prohibition of adultery precedes that of killing. [*28]

Protestant

Eighth Commandment

Thou shalt not steal.

Catholic

Eighth Commandment

Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor.

Hebrew

Eighth Commandment

Thou shalt not steal.

The agreement between the Protestant and Hebrew versions of this Commandment only emphasizes the falsity of the Catholic arrangement. Page 31

Protestant

Ninth Commandment

Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor.

 

Catholic

Ninth Commandment

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's wife.

 

Hebrew

Ninth Commandment

Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor.

The significance here lies in the fact that the Catholics have taken a part of the Tenth Commandment and made it the ninth! Refer again to the 17th verse of the 20th Chapter of Exodus of the Douay Bible, and it will be plainly seen that this Commandment is in one complete sentence and does not lend itself to a division such as the Catholic Church made in order to cover up its duplicity by omitting the Second Commandment. I quote for the convenience of the reader:

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's house: neither shalt thou desire his wife, nor his servant, nor his handmaid, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is his.

If the Tenth Commandment were divided into two verses or two sentences in the Bible, its separation could have been defended on that score; but even such a flimsy excuse cannot be resorted to as a defense in this monumental piece of brazen deceit and hypocrisy. Certainly the Tenth Commandment does not admit of separation. It deals with but one human trait -- covetousness -- expressed in one complete sentence. In addition, the first line of the Commandment, in both the Hebrew and Protestant versions, reads, "Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house..." [**29] The Catholic arrangement of the Decalogue makes "Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's wife" the Ninth Commandment, and coveting the neighbour's property the tenth. Catholics apparently use the Deuteronomy version as the source for the Ninth and Tenth Commandments. By doing this, they are placed in the position of accepting the reason for the observance of the Sabbath as the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. "Confusion worse confounded!" Page 32

Protestant

Tenth Commandment

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbor's.

Catholic

Tenth Commandment

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's goods.

Hebrew

Tenth Commandment

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's house; thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbour's.

While the Protestants and Hebrews agree as to the Tenth Commandment, the Catholic version continues with a mutilated arrangement, leaving out vital details of the Biblical text, essential to the understanding of this Commandment.

Before turning our attention to an analysis of the ethical, moral and philosophical value of the Commandments, I should like to mention an incident which occurred just before a former mayor of the City of New York, James J. Walker, departed for an extended European trip. The Grand Street Boys' Association held a dinner in his honor. At its conclusion, as a token of the good will and harmony among those present, who comprised Protestants, Jews and Catholics, Supreme Court Justice Edward Riegelman presented to Mr. Walker, on behalf of the association, a golden scroll of the Ten Commandments written in Hebrew, with the following remark: "This is presented by Hebrews, through a Protestant, to a Catholic as an expression of the plane upon which all hope to stand."

If "the plane upon which all hope to stand" is no better than their agreement on the Ten Commandments, then they are all doomed to fall!

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