• Table of Contents
  • About Frames Version
  • No Frames Index
     
  • 1. What Is Atheism?
  • a. Regular Atheism.
  • i. Vilifying One-Fifth of Humanity.
  • ii. Noncognitivism: "The God Idea Makes no Sense."
  • iii. Three Coordinates of Atheism.
  • (1) Strong Compared To Weak.
  • (2) Definition Compared To Position.
  • (3) Claims versus "Deep" Reality.
  • (4) Summary.
  • iv. The Weak Definition: The Absence of Theism.
  • (1) Historical Precedence for the Weak Definition.
  • (2) The Meaning of the Word Atheism.
  • (3) The Meaninglessness of Word Meanings.
  • (4) Advantage Through Inclusiveness.
  • (5) Who Prefers the Strong Definition?
  • (6) When Theism Even Crosses Our Minds.
  • v. The Strong Position: "No Gods Exist."
  • (1) The Case for the Strong Position.
  • (2) Liberal Scientific Method and Philosophical Inquiry.
  • vi. Atheist As Vitriolic Smear Word.
     
  • b. The Philosophy of Positive Atheism.
  • i. Insisting upon Truthfulness: The Highest Ethic.
  • ii. Seeking a Dignified Expression of Atheism.
  • (1) Faith as a Product of Evolution.
  • (2) The Theist Has Reasons to Believe.
  • (3) The Atheist Who Wouldn't Evangelize.
  • (4) Standing Our Ground.
  • (5) Conclusion.
     
  • 2. What Is Theism?
  • a. Our Use of the Word God.
  • b. Any Power Greater Than Ourselves?
  • c. Pantheism or Naturalistic Religion.
  • d. Universalism: Choose Your Own Theism.
  • e. Deism or Naturalistic Revelation.
  • f. Revealed Religion.
  • g. Traditional Concepts of Monotheism.
  • i. Monotheism and Polytheism.
  • ii. Monotheism Breeds Intolerance.
  • iii. Monotheism's Polytheistic Tendencies.
  • h. The Supernatural or Transcendent God.
  • i. The Unknowable God.
     
  • 3. Discussing Atheism with Others.
  • a. The Presumption of Atheism.
  • b. Alternate Explanations.
  • c. Understanding the Word God.
  • d. Solidification and Isolation.
     
  • e. Sophistry: Logical and Rhetorical Fallacies; Faulty Reasoning.
  • i. Unacceptable or Insufficient Premises.
  • (1) Begging the Question.
  • (2) False Dichotomy.
  • (3) Straw Man.
  • (4) Reductio ad Absurdum (Slippery Slope).
  • (5) Post Hoc, Ergo Propter Hoc (False Cause).
  • (6) Non Sequitur (It Does Not Follow).
  • (7) Faulty Analogy.
  • (8) Equivocation.
  • (9) Hasty Generalization.
  • (10) Suppressed Evidence (Half-Truths).
     
  • ii. Irrelevant Premises.
  • (1) Ad Verecundiam (Appeal to Respect; Overreliance on Authorities).
  • (2) Appeal To Tradition.
  • (3) Ad Populum (Appeal to Popularity; Appeal to the Masses).
  • (4) Ad Hominem (Appeal To the Person).
  • (5) Genetic Fallacy.
  • (6) Appeal To Ignorance (Ad Ignorantiam).
  • (7) Argument from Adverse Consequences (Appeal to Fear).
  • (8) Special Pleading.
  • (9) Weasel Words; Oxymoronic Language.
  • (10) Strange Loops and Meaningless Questions.
     
  • iii. Misuse of Statistics.
  • (1) Observational Selection (Representativeness).
  • (2) Statistics of Small Numbers.
  • (3) Composition and Division.
  • (4) Misunderstanding of the Nature of Statistics.
     
  • iv. Problems in Pseudoscientific Thinking.
  • (1) Anecdotes Do Not Make a Science.
  • (2) Scientific Language Does Not Make a Science.
  • (3) Bold Statements Do Not Make Claims True.
  • (4) Heresy Does Not Equal Correctness.
  • (5) Rumors Do Not Equal Reality.