Footnotes:
"Introduction to Activistic Atheism"
"Discussing Atheism With Others"

99.  Theodore Schick, Jr. and Lewis Vaughn, How to Think About Weird Things (1995), Appendix: "Informal Fallacies," p. 289.

100.  Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) p. 57.

101.  Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) p. 57.

102.  Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) p. 57.

103.  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," pp. 212.

104.  Theodore Schick, Jr. and Lewis Vaughn, How to Think About Weird Things (1995), Appendix: "Informal Fallacies," p. 289.

105.  Conrad Goeringer, "Religious Commemorations Threaten First Amendment" (November 12, 1997) AANEWS.

106.  Kimberly Hefling, "Kentucky School Displays Ten Commandments" (August 12, 1999) Associated Press.

107.  Larry Witham "Evolution Takes a Hit in Kansas Schools" (August 12, 1999) The Washington Times.

108.  See H. L. Mencken's coverage of the "Scopes Monkey Trial."

109.  Theodore Schick, Jr. and Lewis Vaughn, How to Think About Weird Things (1995), Appendix: "Informal Fallacies," p. 289.

110.  Quoted in James A. Haught, 2000 Years of Disbelief (1997), p. 38.

111.  Contact The Feminist Majority.

112.  Steve Blow, Some Offerings for Southern Baptist Leaders" (June 26, 1998), The Dallas Morning News.

113.  Paul, in I Timothy 6:1-2 (New International Version).

Paul makes sure nobody underestimates the importance of the pro-slavery doctrine with this follow-up: "If any man teach otherwise, and consent not to wholesome words, even the words of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to the doctrine which is according to godliness; He is proud, knowing nothing, but doting about questions and strifes of words, whereof cometh envy, strife, railings, evil surmisings, Perverse disputings of men of corrupt minds, and destitute of the truth, supposing that gain is godliness: from such withdraw thyself." (I Timothy 6:3-5, King James Version.)

Note that some of the newer translations appear to disguise or omit the connection of this passage to the slavery passage: "If anyone teaches false doctrines..." (New International Version) and less blatantly, "If anyone advocates a different doctrine..." (New American Standard Bible). Most of the major translations contain the word otherwise to refer back to the slavery passage.

114.  Thomas Paine, quoted by Joseph Lewis in Inspiration and Wisdom from the Writings of Thomas Paine. (See the passage in question.)

115.  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," p. 212.

116.  Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) p. 56.

117.  Robert M. Price, Deconstructing Jesus, pp. 100-101 (Prometheus, 2000).

118.  "Among some of the better known evangelists -- Jimmy Swaggert, the Bakkers and Billy Hargis -- posturings of righteousness turned into embarrassment. Swaggert was found with a prostitute, and on the air he wept, confessing what everyone already knew. Jim Bakker would be sent to prison for fraud, and he would write a book entitled I was Wrong in which he denounced not only his 'prosperity theology' but also what he called 'the seductive nature of power.' Hargis had founded a Bible college, the American Christian College, and in 1974 several students at the school, male and female, accused Hargis of sexual improprieties. Hargis resigned as the college's president, and in 1977 the college closed." -- Frank Smitha, "Religion, from Vatican II To the Ayatollah Khomeini," Chapter 29 of his online book, World History.

119.  Theodore Schick, Jr. and Lewis Vaughn, How to Think About Weird Things (1995), Appendix: "Informal Fallacies," p. 288.

120.  Frank Miele, "Keeping a Skeptical Eye on Extremists -- And on Those Who Keep an Eye on Them," in Skeptic Magazine (1997) vol. 5, no. 2, p. 105, paraphrasing the book American Extremists by John George and Laird Wilcox.

Nevertheless, the first advocate of racial equality in America was Thomas Paine.

121.  Audience members at a lecture by Phoebe Ellsworth, described in Barbara Ehrenreich and Janet McIntosh, "The New Creationism: Biology Under Attack," The Nation (June 9, 1997).

122.  Theodore Schick, Jr. and Lewis Vaughn, How to Think About Weird Things (1995), Appendix: "Informal Fallacies," p. 288.

122b.  Robert M. Price, "Christ a Fiction" (1997).

123.  Proverbs 3:5 (King James Version). The Revised Standard Version says, "do not rely on your own insight" and John Nelson Darby says, "lean not unto thine own intelligence."

124.  Robert Green Ingersoll, "The Field-Ingersoll Debate" Part II. (1887), "A Reply to the Rev. Henry M. Field, D.D." From The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, vol. vi., p. 145.

125.  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," p. 213.

126.  Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) p. 49.

127.  Sheena McDonald, "Interview: Richard Dawkins" on "The Vision Thing," 15 August 1994, Channel 4 (U.K.).

128.  Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) pp. 55-6.

129.  Theodore Schick, Jr. and Lewis Vaughn, How to Think About Weird Things (1995), Appendix: "Informal Fallacies," p. 290.

130.  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," pp. 212-13.

131.  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," pp. 213 footnote.

132.  Unsigned letter to Positive Atheism.

133.  George Bernard Shaw, Androcles and the Lion, (1916), Preface.

134.  The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Third Edition (1996).

135.  Merriam-Webster's Tenth Collegiate Dictionary (1994).

136.  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," pp. 213.

137.  Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord, quoted in Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," pp. 216.

138.  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," p. 216.

139.  Cliff Walker, "Atheism and Fundamentalism," Positive Atheism Magazine, December, 1999. See also Michael Shermer's "Response to our December, 1999 Column, 'Atheism and Fundamentalism," Positive Atheism Magazine, December, 1999.

140.  The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Third Edition (1996).

141.  Merriam-Webster's Tenth Collegiate Dictionary (1994).

142.  Oxford American Dictionary (1980).

143.  Michael Faranti, of The Disposable Heroes of Hiphopricy, "Television, The Drug of a Nation," from the 1991 CD Hiphopricy is the Gretest Luxury.

144.  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," pp. 215.

145.  Coined by Douglas Hofstadter, Goedel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, (1979), pp. 15, 161-162, 582.

146.  Paul, in Titus 1:12-3 (New International Version).

147.  Robert Anton Wilson, The New Inquisition (1987) pp. 60.

148.  Robert Anton Wilson, The New Inquisition (1987) pp. 61.

149.  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," pp. 213-4.

150.  Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) p. 56.

151.  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," pp. 214.

152.  Unsigned e-mail to Positive Atheism, October 1, 2000, from somebody called "PraisingAngel."

153.  Theodore Schick, Jr. and Lewis Vaughn, How to Think About Weird Things (1995), Appendix: "Informal Fallacies," p. 287.

154.  Theodore Schick, Jr. and Lewis Vaughn, How to Think About Weird Things (1995), Appendix: "Informal Fallacies," p. 287-8.

155.  Theodore Schick, Jr. and Lewis Vaughn, How to Think About Weird Things (1995), Appendix: "Informal Fallacies," p. 288.

156.  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995), ch. 12, "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection," pp. 214.

157.  Victor J. Stenger, lecture, Portland, Oregon, November 6, 1999. (Paraphrase.)

158.  Based on Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) "How Thinking Goes Wrong" pp. 44-61.

159.  Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) "How Thinking Goes Wrong" p. 48.

160.  Cliff Walker, "Such Educated People, Wot?" which is based on a monologue by skeptical radio host Dr. Dean Edel, the Thursday after the bodies of the HeavensGate sect were discovered.

161.  Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) "How Thinking Goes Wrong" p. 49.

162.  Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont, Fashionable Nonsense (1998), pp. 1-6.

163.  Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) "How Thinking Goes Wrong" p. 49.

164.  L. Ron Hubbard, Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health (1950), quoted in Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) p. 49, from Martin Gardner, Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science (1952).

165.  Martin Gardner, Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science (1952), quoted in Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) p. 49.

166.  Rep. Scarborough of Florida, in "House Resolution On Decalogue Passes" from the Congressional Record (March 5, 1997), prepared by Cliff Walker.

167.  In fact, James Madison held quite contrary statements: "Is the appointment of Chaplains to the two Houses of Congress consistent with the Constitution, and with the pure principle of religious freedom? In strictness the answer on both points must be in the negative. The Constitution of the United States forbids everything like an establishment of a national religion. The law appointing Chaplains establishes a religious worship for the national representatives, to be performed by Ministers of religion, elected by a majority of them, and these are to be paid out of the national taxes. Does this not involve the principle of a national establishment...?" ("Essay on Monopolies," unpublished until 1946.)

168.  Rob Boston, "Consumer Alert: WallBuilders' Shoddy Workmanship" in Church & State Magazine, July-August, 1996.

169.  "House Resolution On Decalogue Passes" from the Congressional Record (March 5, 1997). Rep. Scarborough made this statement against "radical revisionists," followed by his use of a known false quotation, nearly a year after David Barton issued a statement to his followers asking them to stop using this and other false quotations.

170.  Quoted in Michael Shermer, Why People Believe Weird Things (1997) p. 50.

171.  Robert Anton Wilson, The New Inquisition (1987) pp. 38, 40.

172.  Robert Anton Wilson, The New Inquisition (1987) p. 41.

173.  Robert Anton Wilson, The New Inquisition (1987) p. 41.

174.  Jon Murray and Madalyn Murray O'Hair, All the Questions You Ever Wanted to Ask American Atheists: With All the Answers (1982), vol. ii., p. 128.

175.  Ronald J. Barrier, "Myth Conceptions, The FCC, and Madalyn O'Hair" (August, 1998).

176.  Ronald J. Barrier, "Myth Conceptions, The FCC, and Madalyn O'Hair" (August, 1998).

177.  Chicago Tribune. April 3, 1977.

178.  Jon Murray and Madalyn Murray O'Hair, All the Questions You Ever Wanted to Ask American Atheists: With All the Answers (1982), vol. ii., p. 129.

179.  Conrad Goeringer, AANEWS for August 29, 1998.

180.  Jon Murray and Madalyn Murray O'Hair, All the Questions You Ever Wanted to Ask American Atheists: With All the Answers (1982), vol. ii., p. 129.

181.  No Consumer Per-Minute Charges to Access ISPs."

182.  "E-Mail Rumor Completely Untrue."

183.  Summarized from Terrence E. Deal, Allan A. Kennedy, Corporate Cultures: The Rites and Rituals of Corporate Life (1984).

184.  Lisa Bannon, "How a Rumor Spread About Subliminal Sex In Disney's 'Aladdin'" (October 24, 1995) The Wall Street Journal.

185.  Cecil Adams, in "Straight Dope."

186.  Medline Industries, Inc.

187.  Ian York, The AFU and Urban Legend Archive.